After last year’s “Divas,” it was the turn of male pop stars to get choreographic treatment in Dance Kaleidoscope’s seventh engagement at the Indianapolis Theatre Fringe Festival.

So, of course, “Divos” debuted Thursday night as one of several shows to kick off the 13th annual festival. At Theatre on the Square,

seven members of the contemporary-dance company presented premieres of works choreographed to songs by celebrity male performers of the past few decades.

The songs’ rhythmic drive and musical phrasing naturally generate much of the choreography, but the choreographers also have in common an intense interest in how lyrics can guide dance expression. This is clear from each choreographer’s spoken introduction to his or her creation — statements that provide the audience with insights into the personal sources and motivations behind the program.

In other words, the divos were celebrated mainly to the degree their music had something vital to impart in dance terms. From Aerosmith’s “Dream On” (Missy Thompson) to Rod Stewart’s “I’ll Stand By You” (Stuart Coleman, in a piece titled “Surround Yourself”), the program unfailingly added an extra dimension to the songs.

“Dream On” rested on the theme of recurring dreams, mostly disturbing, and thus was replete with floating and falling movement, as well as postures of apprehensiveness and confusion, some as if airborne, others grounded. “Surround Yourself” used the full company to reinforce the virtues of group support. Its intricately coordinated, billowing language put stress on cooperation and rapport, the individual drawing sustenance from the ensemble. A particularly striking passage had the company unfolding from a tight circle outward, yielding to a solo in the center. It was like time-lapse photography of a flower in transition from bud to blossom.

Positive energy also was held up in Mariel Greenlee’s “Keep Faith,” to music of George Michael. There were churchy moments at first, alluded to later, with stained-glass lighting and prayerful postures. But faith was also addressed in less transcendent ways, in a manner that expertly bridged the meaning of faith from something remote to something near at hand. In both cases, belief in the unseen is the common denominator, and “Keep Faith” spoke particularly to the reservoir of mutual trust upon which dancers necessarily draw.

As a dancer, Greenlee had to draw upon such trust spectacularly in Brandon Comer’s “Dangerous Diana,” a medley of Michael Jackson’s “Dangerous” and “Dirty Diana.” She was the title character, supported by five DK men, and had to keep embodying the first song’s laserlike opening line: “There was something different about this girl.” Comer’s choreography avoided the King of Pop’s stylized, angular twitches and tap-rooted footwork to come up with something original, requiring a considerable amount of lift, flexibility and panache from everyone concerned — and trust galore from Greenlee, who managed to convey both danger and vulnerability as a woman being both venerated and tossed about.

Romantic devotion was a keynote of Paige Robinson’s “You Take My Breath Away,” the soaring Queen vocalism providing the cue for intense interaction among the six dancers. The same number of dancers was used in a more polarized fashion by Timothy June, setting Johnny Cash’s searing “Hurt”: Each of three fully visible dancers has a demonic masked partner, making the theme of hurt vividly both internal and external to how we live our lives. The demonic side seemed to score a final victory with a black hand over each anguished face.

Jillian Godwin set the longest piece, a mash-up (mixed by Mike Lamirand) of four Led Zeppelin songs. “Zeppelin” was a real tour-de-force for the troupe’s women, the shift among songs complemented by costuming as well as different choreographic dialects. The full ensemble coalesced for the finale. At that climactic stage, the potentially problematic guitar solo — talk about divos! who’s more a divo than a rock-guitar god? — was neatly handled with fluid solos and duos for the dancers, yielding to re-emphasis on the ensemble at the end.

As with the whole show, the music was never allowed to swamp the inspiration behind the choreography nor the flair with which it was executed. Roll over, divos; tell the divas the news!